Men's Watches

ITS ALL ABOUT THE MOVEMENT SIZE

ONCE UPON A TIME

Once upon a time, there was a boy, called Billy. He was a smart-alec, know-it-all who always tells himself that he doesn’t need to do his research before buying anything. Anything that he thinks is interesting and worth the money, he will buy without thinking twice.

 

At that time, Billy was searching through the e-commerce store and found a watch that interests him. It looks nice, has a modern appearance, black color plating on its case and bracelet.  It even looks like the classic Daniel Wellington watch. Furthermore, it was super cheap and was selling for RM109.00.

 

And before you know it, Billy has already clicked “Add to Cart” and paid. Thinking that he made the best choice, Billy waits in anticipation for the watch. A week later, the watch arrives. He was excited. But his excitement turns into disappointment when he finally got hold of the watch.

 

Why? It was because the watch was too small. The face of the watch is 40mm in diameter, which unfortunately for Billy, is just too small for his wrist. From then onwards, Billy never buys anything online without doing his RESEARCH first.

 

 

INTRODUCTION

 

The story above is an illustration, that without doing a good research, we MUST not buy anything under impulse. Of course, there are times that we cannot control ourselves and give in. However, between us men, I truly believe this applies to watches as well.

 

You see, in my previous post, I explore the meaning of caliber and how it relates to the word movement. If you missed my previous post, you can click here to find out the meaning of caliber. The most common movement or caliber shape is the round shape case. Of course, there are other shapes of the watch itself, which will be discussed further on.

 

An example as shown in the Seiko SKS 611P1, with a diameter of 43mm.

 

 

WHAT IF I CANT FIND THE SIZE OF THE MOVEMENT/ CALIBER?

 

Sometimes, watchmakers do not directly tell you the size of the movement/ caliber. Instead, they use terms like 3H, 6H, 9H, and 12H. What do all these terms mean? Let us take the Stuhrling Agent 768 from Stuhrling Original as an example for our case study.

 

The only information I obtain from this watch through its website are these numbers,

 

3H-9H:42mm

6H-12H:42mm

 

Now, I believe my readers are smart and can catch on very quickly what these numbers mean. However, for the sake of everyone, let us assume that we do not know the meaning of these numbers. To break down simply, 3H-9H is the length from the 3rd hand to the 9th hand of the watch’s direction.

 

Similarly, the 6H-12H shows you the length from the 6th hand to the 12th hand direction of the watch. Both the length from 3H-9H and 6H-12H are 42mmrespectively. Therefore, the diameter of the round case watch is 42mm.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

However, please pay attention especially the 3H-9H length. This is because the length is only taken from one end of the case to the other end, not including the length of the crown on the side.

MUST THEY ALL BE THE SAME LENGTH?

 

Although the most common shape of all the watch is round, there are instances whereby the watches are not regular shaped. There are watches that have round bezel, but one length is longer than the other. An example of a watch is the Madison 5003 by So&Co as shown below.

 

The 3H-9H and the 6H-12H length is not the same length, as it is already stated. The length of the 3rd Hand to the 9th Hand is 47mm, while the length of the 6th Hand and 12th Hand is only 43mm. Clearly, the length of the 3H-9H is longer due to the way the lugs was designed to be part of the watch case in this direction.

 

 

CONCLUSION

 

Regardless of the different shapes of the watch movement/caliber, the general rule to apply when measuring the diameter is the same. You take the length measurement from the 3H-9H and from the 6H-12H, but not including the length of the crown on the side. However, just knowing the size of the watch cannot give us the information that we need.

 

Numbers cannot paint the picture of how the watch and if it fits on to your wrist. Unless of course, you use a ruler and a pen to measure the watch diameter on your wrist. But, that will be silly, isn’t it? Well, in order to be able to imagine its size, please take a look at the watch size guide below from Sturhling.com. This is very useful to help you to decide and gives you an overall view of the size of the watch you want.

 

 

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